The Art of the Photogravure
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Pre 1880's
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1880's - 1940's
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Photogravure Timeline
Pre 1880's1880s-1940sPost 1960s Contemporary Gravure Work
1300
Intaglio printmaking is invented by artists of the Italian Renaissance.Intaglio Printing
1798
Aloys Senefelder develops Lithography.
1822
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, living in France, creates the first photomechanical reproduction, a photo etching of a horse and his leader.
1826
Niépce successfully reproduces in photogravure an etching of Cardinal D'Amboise.

Niépce creates the first camera image using a camera obscura and his photo etching process.
1833
Joseph Nicéphore Niépce dies.
1834
Henry Fox Talbot creates the first permanent (negative) images using paper soaked in silver chloride and fixed with a salt solution.
1838
Talbot's first recorded notes using the rays of the sun to etch on steel.
1839
Louis Daguerre announces his invention of the daguerrotype.

Hippolyte-Louis Fizeau etches and prints a daguerrotype in an effort to produce multiple copies.
1841
Talbot patents his process under the name "calotype".
1844
Pencil of NatureTalbot publishes "The Pencil of Nature," the first book illustrated with original photographs.
1851
Archer invents the wet-plate collodion process.
1852
Talbot patents his photographic engraving process, which produces printable steel plates.
1858
Talbot patents "Improvements in the Art of Engraving," named the process photoglyphic engraving and discovers the use of aquatint.

Photographic News (London) includes an original Photoglyphic Engraving demonstrating for the first time that photogravures could be produced in large enough numbers to illustrate books and journals.
1862
Joseph Wilson SwanJoseph Wilson Swan patents the carbo process.
1864
Walter Woodbury patents the woodburytype process.
1878
Karl KlícKarl Klíc invented the grain gravure, the most precise, economical and beautiful method of photogravure printing, which is still used today.
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